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rajia rimi
Jun 21, 2022
In NBA Discussion Board
Recently, I was talking to a client about a new project when he brought up Industry Email List an interesting question. He was curious how I measured EAT, or “Expertise, Authority, and Trustworthiness,” against SEO. If you're unfamiliar with EAT, it's a term taken from Google's Guidelines for Quality Evaluators, a set of instructions that Google's army of several thousand Industry Email List human reviewers (called internally "reviewers" or "search quality raters") uses to assess the quality of web content manually. While it's sometimes hard to understand Google's internal processes, from what I've heard from trusted sources at Google, EAT applies specifically to Industry Email List YMYL (Your Money or Your Life) websites, it's i.e. sites offering medical or financial advice. As you'd expect, Google prefers not to give misleading or unreliable advice that could affect your financial or physical well-being, so it's very important to pay close attention to the Industry Email List information presented on these Industry Email List types of websites. Now, my client's website was not in a financial or medical niche, so technically these guidelines don't affect him directly. After all, Google - it is said - does not apply EAT Industry Email List at all levels. But I didn't tell the customer not to worry about EAT. Far from there. In my opinion, expertise, authority, and trustworthiness are things that every business should seek to develop both online and offline. What company wouldn't want to be recognized and trusted in their industry (and beyond)? I Industry Email List asked my co-author on The Art of SEO, Eric Enge, to weigh in on this EAT question and whether it applies to YMYL only or more broadly across the web. He replied, “Google is very technical and precise in how they use various terms. Within Google,
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